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Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective is a speculative museum exhibition that narratives the history of the Department of Reproductive Labor, a fictional city agency.  It is an effort to raise awareness on the lack of government intervention to alleviate the burdens of caring for others, and consider the integration of civic sentiments on policy-making.  This project is a part of a collection of projects I completed during my MFA which explore the asymmetrical relationship between productive labor (which sustains economies) and reproductive labor (which sustains human beings). This particular project includes several artifacts of the DRL (Department of Reproductive Labor) from the years 2030-2055.  The exhibit itself is set in the year 2060 and was presented at NYC Media Lab in September 2019. 

In collaboration with Cassandra Hradil, Zina Bazarbashi, and Emi Sato.

2020-2030: The Caregiving Crisis

Back in 2020, it was unthinkable to imagine a future government so invested in the labor which produces people. Its focus then was solely on the production of profit, with little concern for the emotional, physical, and financial burdens of care. This period witnessed a huge shift in demographics; there was an ever-growing aging population who wished to age in their homes. Families with financial means relied on someone else to care for their aging loved ones. Caregivers worked tirelessly for 24 hours a day -- in most cases, with unlivable wages. Families who lived precariously had to take on the caregiving themselves, and were burdened by one of the most physically and emotionally straining types of work.

2030: The New New Deal and Reproductive Labor

By 2030, the federal government initiated the New New Deal (NND) which made funds available for a variety of social programs, such as universal healthcare, an increased HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) budget, and the caregiving of elders and differently abled people. While childcare was on the debate, there was a general assumption in the administration that most family members make a reasonable wage and can take care of their children on their own. 

In 2033, the Department of Reproductive Labor was established in New York City to manage and distribute the New New Deal funds to social reproduction. With federal restrictions on the allocation of funds and resources, the DRL focused on the development of robots and nano-chip technology for the care of the elderly and differently abled population. But the robots could not do everything. People still valued the feeling of human companionship - of conversations, empathy and emotional care - and human caregivers were still in high demand. The robots handled the physical care, while the humans did the emotional work. An Automated Wage Adjustment act was established to offset the caregivers’ shortened work days.

2035: The WeProductive Movement

By the mid 2030’s, young families who were still suffering from the absence of services from the DRL decided to come together and share household responsibilities. They formed online groups to lend each other a hand in some of the more menial tasks that make being a parent so stressful. In 5 years, software engineers and designers in one of these groups created an app called “WeProductive” that would dispatch certain tasks to their friend network and neighborhood and make this exchange more efficient.

While the app was extremely popular, it also created some unexpected problems. It became culturally segregating and amplified the homogeneity of neighborhoods. Friends who lived far apart moved closer to each other to enable more efficient task sharing. What started as an app intended to help young families began to have a negative effect on the lives of all city residents. Rents of these neighborhood clusters went up, and it became even harder to find housing anywhere in New York City.

2045: The Reproductive Commons

This is when the city stepped in. By 2045, the DRL began developing the Reproductive Commons, a housing development designed specifically to incorporate automation into social reproduction. The application process favored families with small children in the low to mid income range. The process was extremely competitive, and it still reflected the inequality and segregation it was meant to combat. Hundreds of thousands of families were still left to fend for themselves. 

By 2050, people began to move into the Commons. Families in the development reported spending more time together and children enjoyed better care because of the nexus of automation and task sharing. In some ways the development fulfilled utopian promises offered by architects and planners of earlier eras.

Three years after the opening of the Commons, the DRL attempted to overcome the unfairness at its core by hiring a labor force of caregivers to be made accessible to all city residents who do not live in the Commons. The caregivers who used to freelance for aged baby boomers became city workers. Most of them were former inmates, migrants, and people living in poverty. 

Present Day

The present year is 2060, and the Reproductive Commons has been running for a decade with much success. Nearly all families in New York City have free access to childcare and caregiving. The DRL must now answer to a new aspect of the reproductive labor movement. Within the Commons and elsewhere, some women are now demanding liberation from gestation itself. More and more are turning to surrogates to bear their children, opening new class divides that the DRL will have to address. There is talk of a new type of reproductive commons strictly for breeding, intended to raise children scientifically through their most sensitive years before they live with their parents full time.

It is unclear if the state can keep up with these demands. It took decades to implement the DRL and the Commons program, and a further and final push for liberation from all child bearing may be too great a task for even the best run programs. 

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective is a speculative museum exhibition that narratives the history of the Department of Reproductive Labor, a fictional city agency.  It is an effort to raise awareness on the lack of government intervention to alleviate the burdens of caring for others, and consider the integration of civic sentiments on policy-making.  This project is a part of a collection of projects I completed during my MFA which explore the asymmetrical relationship between productive labor (which sustains economies) and reproductive labor (which sustains human beings). This particular project includes several artifacts of the DRL (Department of Reproductive Labor) from the years 2030-2055.  The exhibit itself is set in the year 2060 and was presented at NYC Media Lab in September 2019. 

In collaboration with Cassandra Hradil, Zina Bazarbashi, and Emi Sato.

2020-2030: The Caregiving Crisis

Back in 2020, it was unthinkable to imagine a future government so invested in the labor which produces people. Its focus then was solely on the production of profit, with little concern for the emotional, physical, and financial burdens of care. This period witnessed a huge shift in demographics; there was an ever-growing aging population who wished to age in their homes. Families with financial means relied on someone else to care for their aging loved ones. Caregivers worked tirelessly for 24 hours a day -- in most cases, with unlivable wages. Families who lived precariously had to take on the caregiving themselves, and were burdened by one of the most physically and emotionally straining types of work.

2030: The New New Deal and Reproductive Labor

By 2030, the federal government initiated the New New Deal (NND) which made funds available for a variety of social programs, such as universal healthcare, an increased HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) budget, and the caregiving of elders and differently abled people. While childcare was on the debate, there was a general assumption in the administration that most family members make a reasonable wage and can take care of their children on their own. 

In 2033, the Department of Reproductive Labor was established in New York City to manage and distribute the New New Deal funds to social reproduction. With federal restrictions on the allocation of funds and resources, the DRL focused on the development of robots and nano-chip technology for the care of the elderly and differently abled population. But the robots could not do everything. People still valued the feeling of human companionship - of conversations, empathy and emotional care - and human caregivers were still in high demand. The robots handled the physical care, while the humans did the emotional work. An Automated Wage Adjustment act was established to offset the caregivers’ shortened work days.

2035: The WeProductive Movement

By the mid 2030’s, young families who were still suffering from the absence of services from the DRL decided to come together and share household responsibilities. They formed online groups to lend each other a hand in some of the more menial tasks that make being a parent so stressful. In 5 years, software engineers and designers in one of these groups created an app called “WeProductive” that would dispatch certain tasks to their friend network and neighborhood and make this exchange more efficient.

While the app was extremely popular, it also created some unexpected problems. It became culturally segregating and amplified the homogeneity of neighborhoods. Friends who lived far apart moved closer to each other to enable more efficient task sharing. What started as an app intended to help young families began to have a negative effect on the lives of all city residents. Rents of these neighborhood clusters went up, and it became even harder to find housing anywhere in New York City.

2045: The Reproductive Commons

This is when the city stepped in. By 2045, the DRL began developing the Reproductive Commons, a housing development designed specifically to incorporate automation into social reproduction. The application process favored families with small children in the low to mid income range. The process was extremely competitive, and it still reflected the inequality and segregation it was meant to combat. Hundreds of thousands of families were still left to fend for themselves. 

By 2050, people began to move into the Commons. Families in the development reported spending more time together and children enjoyed better care because of the nexus of automation and task sharing. In some ways the development fulfilled utopian promises offered by architects and planners of earlier eras.

Three years after the opening of the Commons, the DRL attempted to overcome the unfairness at its core by hiring a labor force of caregivers to be made accessible to all city residents who do not live in the Commons. The caregivers who used to freelance for aged baby boomers became city workers. Most of them were former inmates, migrants, and people living in poverty. 

Present Day

The present year is 2060, and the Reproductive Commons has been running for a decade with much success. Nearly all families in New York City have free access to childcare and caregiving. The DRL must now answer to a new aspect of the reproductive labor movement. Within the Commons and elsewhere, some women are now demanding liberation from gestation itself. More and more are turning to surrogates to bear their children, opening new class divides that the DRL will have to address. There is talk of a new type of reproductive commons strictly for breeding, intended to raise children scientifically through their most sensitive years before they live with their parents full time.

It is unclear if the state can keep up with these demands. It took decades to implement the DRL and the Commons program, and a further and final push for liberation from all child bearing may be too great a task for even the best run programs. 

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective is a speculative museum exhibition that narratives the history of the Department of Reproductive Labor, a fictional city agency.  It is an effort to raise awareness on the lack of government intervention to alleviate the burdens of caring for others, and consider the integration of civic sentiments on policy-making.  This project is a part of a collection of projects I completed during my MFA which explore the asymmetrical relationship between productive labor (which sustains economies) and reproductive labor (which sustains human beings). This particular project includes several artifacts of the DRL (Department of Reproductive Labor) from the years 2030-2055.  The exhibit itself is set in the year 2060 and was presented at NYC Media Lab in September 2019. 

In collaboration with Cassandra Hradil, Zina Bazarbashi, and Emi Sato.

2020-2030: The Caregiving Crisis

Back in 2020, it was unthinkable to imagine a future government so invested in the labor which produces people. Its focus then was solely on the production of profit, with little concern for the emotional, physical, and financial burdens of care. This period witnessed a huge shift in demographics; there was an ever-growing aging population who wished to age in their homes. Families with financial means relied on someone else to care for their aging loved ones. Caregivers worked tirelessly for 24 hours a day -- in most cases, with unlivable wages. Families who lived precariously had to take on the caregiving themselves, and were burdened by one of the most physically and emotionally straining types of work.

2030: The New New Deal and Reproductive Labor

By 2030, the federal government initiated the New New Deal (NND) which made funds available for a variety of social programs, such as universal healthcare, an increased HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) budget, and the caregiving of elders and differently abled people. While childcare was on the debate, there was a general assumption in the administration that most family members make a reasonable wage and can take care of their children on their own. 

In 2033, the Department of Reproductive Labor was established in New York City to manage and distribute the New New Deal funds to social reproduction. With federal restrictions on the allocation of funds and resources, the DRL focused on the development of robots and nano-chip technology for the care of the elderly and differently abled population. But the robots could not do everything. People still valued the feeling of human companionship - of conversations, empathy and emotional care - and human caregivers were still in high demand. The robots handled the physical care, while the humans did the emotional work. An Automated Wage Adjustment act was established to offset the caregivers’ shortened work days.

2035: The WeProductive Movement

By the mid 2030’s, young families who were still suffering from the absence of services from the DRL decided to come together and share household responsibilities. They formed online groups to lend each other a hand in some of the more menial tasks that make being a parent so stressful. In 5 years, software engineers and designers in one of these groups created an app called “WeProductive” that would dispatch certain tasks to their friend network and neighborhood and make this exchange more efficient.

While the app was extremely popular, it also created some unexpected problems. It became culturally segregating and amplified the homogeneity of neighborhoods. Friends who lived far apart moved closer to each other to enable more efficient task sharing. What started as an app intended to help young families began to have a negative effect on the lives of all city residents. Rents of these neighborhood clusters went up, and it became even harder to find housing anywhere in New York City.

2045: The Reproductive Commons

This is when the city stepped in. By 2045, the DRL began developing the Reproductive Commons, a housing development designed specifically to incorporate automation into social reproduction. The application process favored families with small children in the low to mid income range. The process was extremely competitive, and it still reflected the inequality and segregation it was meant to combat. Hundreds of thousands of families were still left to fend for themselves. 

By 2050, people began to move into the Commons. Families in the development reported spending more time together and children enjoyed better care because of the nexus of automation and task sharing. In some ways the development fulfilled utopian promises offered by architects and planners of earlier eras.

Three years after the opening of the Commons, the DRL attempted to overcome the unfairness at its core by hiring a labor force of caregivers to be made accessible to all city residents who do not live in the Commons. The caregivers who used to freelance for aged baby boomers became city workers. Most of them were former inmates, migrants, and people living in poverty. 

Present Day

The present year is 2060, and the Reproductive Commons has been running for a decade with much success. Nearly all families in New York City have free access to childcare and caregiving. The DRL must now answer to a new aspect of the reproductive labor movement. Within the Commons and elsewhere, some women are now demanding liberation from gestation itself. More and more are turning to surrogates to bear their children, opening new class divides that the DRL will have to address. There is talk of a new type of reproductive commons strictly for breeding, intended to raise children scientifically through their most sensitive years before they live with their parents full time.

It is unclear if the state can keep up with these demands. It took decades to implement the DRL and the Commons program, and a further and final push for liberation from all child bearing may be too great a task for even the best run programs. 

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective is a speculative museum exhibition that narratives the history of the Department of Reproductive Labor, a fictional city agency.  It is an effort to raise awareness on the lack of government intervention to alleviate the burdens of caring for others, and consider the integration of civic sentiments on policy-making.  This project is a part of a collection of projects I completed during my MFA which explore the asymmetrical relationship between productive labor (which sustains economies) and reproductive labor (which sustains human beings). This particular project includes several artifacts of the DRL (Department of Reproductive Labor) from the years 2030-2055.  The exhibit itself is set in the year 2060 and was presented at NYC Media Lab in September 2019. 

In collaboration with Cassandra Hradil, Zina Bazarbashi, and Emi Sato.

2020-2030: The Caregiving Crisis

Back in 2020, it was unthinkable to imagine a future government so invested in the labor which produces people. Its focus then was solely on the production of profit, with little concern for the emotional, physical, and financial burdens of care. This period witnessed a huge shift in demographics; there was an ever-growing aging population who wished to age in their homes. Families with financial means relied on someone else to care for their aging loved ones. Caregivers worked tirelessly for 24 hours a day -- in most cases, with unlivable wages. Families who lived precariously had to take on the caregiving themselves, and were burdened by one of the most physically and emotionally straining types of work.

2030: The New New Deal and Reproductive Labor

By 2030, the federal government initiated the New New Deal (NND) which made funds available for a variety of social programs, such as universal healthcare, an increased HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) budget, and the caregiving of elders and differently abled people. While childcare was on the debate, there was a general assumption in the administration that most family members make a reasonable wage and can take care of their children on their own. 

In 2033, the Department of Reproductive Labor was established in New York City to manage and distribute the New New Deal funds to social reproduction. With federal restrictions on the allocation of funds and resources, the DRL focused on the development of robots and nano-chip technology for the care of the elderly and differently abled population. But the robots could not do everything. People still valued the feeling of human companionship - of conversations, empathy and emotional care - and human caregivers were still in high demand. The robots handled the physical care, while the humans did the emotional work. An Automated Wage Adjustment act was established to offset the caregivers’ shortened work days.

2035: The WeProductive Movement

By the mid 2030’s, young families who were still suffering from the absence of services from the DRL decided to come together and share household responsibilities. They formed online groups to lend each other a hand in some of the more menial tasks that make being a parent so stressful. In 5 years, software engineers and designers in one of these groups created an app called “WeProductive” that would dispatch certain tasks to their friend network and neighborhood and make this exchange more efficient.

While the app was extremely popular, it also created some unexpected problems. It became culturally segregating and amplified the homogeneity of neighborhoods. Friends who lived far apart moved closer to each other to enable more efficient task sharing. What started as an app intended to help young families began to have a negative effect on the lives of all city residents. Rents of these neighborhood clusters went up, and it became even harder to find housing anywhere in New York City.

2045: The Reproductive Commons

This is when the city stepped in. By 2045, the DRL began developing the Reproductive Commons, a housing development designed specifically to incorporate automation into social reproduction. The application process favored families with small children in the low to mid income range. The process was extremely competitive, and it still reflected the inequality and segregation it was meant to combat. Hundreds of thousands of families were still left to fend for themselves. 

By 2050, people began to move into the Commons. Families in the development reported spending more time together and children enjoyed better care because of the nexus of automation and task sharing. In some ways the development fulfilled utopian promises offered by architects and planners of earlier eras.

Three years after the opening of the Commons, the DRL attempted to overcome the unfairness at its core by hiring a labor force of caregivers to be made accessible to all city residents who do not live in the Commons. The caregivers who used to freelance for aged baby boomers became city workers. Most of them were former inmates, migrants, and people living in poverty. 

Present Day

The present year is 2060, and the Reproductive Commons has been running for a decade with much success. Nearly all families in New York City have free access to childcare and caregiving. The DRL must now answer to a new aspect of the reproductive labor movement. Within the Commons and elsewhere, some women are now demanding liberation from gestation itself. More and more are turning to surrogates to bear their children, opening new class divides that the DRL will have to address. There is talk of a new type of reproductive commons strictly for breeding, intended to raise children scientifically through their most sensitive years before they live with their parents full time.

It is unclear if the state can keep up with these demands. It took decades to implement the DRL and the Commons program, and a further and final push for liberation from all child bearing may be too great a task for even the best run programs. 

Reproductive Labor: A Retrospective is a speculative museum exhibition that narratives the history of the Department of Reproductive Labor, a fictional city agency.  It is an effort to raise awareness on the lack of government intervention to alleviate the burdens of caring for others, and consider the integration of civic sentiments on policy-making.  This project is a part of a collection of projects I completed during my MFA which explore the asymmetrical relationship between productive labor (which sustains economies) and reproductive labor (which sustains human beings). This particular project includes several artifacts of the DRL (Department of Reproductive Labor) from the years 2030-2055.  The exhibit itself is set in the year 2060 and was presented at NYC Media Lab in September 2019. 

In collaboration with Cassandra Hradil, Zina Bazarbashi, and Emi Sato.

2020-2030: The Caregiving Crisis

Back in 2020, it was unthinkable to imagine a future government so invested in the labor which produces people. Its focus then was solely on the production of profit, with little concern for the emotional, physical, and financial burdens of care. This period witnessed a huge shift in demographics; there was an ever-growing aging population who wished to age in their homes. Families with financial means relied on someone else to care for their aging loved ones. Caregivers worked tirelessly for 24 hours a day -- in most cases, with unlivable wages. Families who lived precariously had to take on the caregiving themselves, and were burdened by one of the most physically and emotionally straining types of work.

2030: The New New Deal and Reproductive Labor

By 2030, the federal government initiated the New New Deal (NND) which made funds available for a variety of social programs, such as universal healthcare, an increased HUD (Department of Housing and Urban Development) budget, and the caregiving of elders and differently abled people. While childcare was on the debate, there was a general assumption in the administration that most family members make a reasonable wage and can take care of their children on their own. 

In 2033, the Department of Reproductive Labor was established in New York City to manage and distribute the New New Deal funds to social reproduction. With federal restrictions on the allocation of funds and resources, the DRL focused on the development of robots and nano-chip technology for the care of the elderly and differently abled population. But the robots could not do everything. People still valued the feeling of human companionship - of conversations, empathy and emotional care - and human caregivers were still in high demand. The robots handled the physical care, while the humans did the emotional work. An Automated Wage Adjustment act was established to offset the caregivers’ shortened work days.

2035: The WeProductive Movement

By the mid 2030’s, young families who were still suffering from the absence of services from the DRL decided to come together and share household responsibilities. They formed online groups to lend each other a hand in some of the more menial tasks that make being a parent so stressful. In 5 years, software engineers and designers in one of these groups created an app called “WeProductive” that would dispatch certain tasks to their friend network and neighborhood and make this exchange more efficient.

While the app was extremely popular, it also created some unexpected problems. It became culturally segregating and amplified the homogeneity of neighborhoods. Friends who lived far apart moved closer to each other to enable more efficient task sharing. What started as an app intended to help young families began to have a negative effect on the lives of all city residents. Rents of these neighborhood clusters went up, and it became even harder to find housing anywhere in New York City.

2045: The Reproductive Commons

This is when the city stepped in. By 2045, the DRL began developing the Reproductive Commons, a housing development designed specifically to incorporate automation into social reproduction. The application process favored families with small children in the low to mid income range. The process was extremely competitive, and it still reflected the inequality and segregation it was meant to combat. Hundreds of thousands of families were still left to fend for themselves. 

By 2050, people began to move into the Commons. Families in the development reported spending more time together and children enjoyed better care because of the nexus of automation and task sharing. In some ways the development fulfilled utopian promises offered by architects and planners of earlier eras.

Three years after the opening of the Commons, the DRL attempted to overcome the unfairness at its core by hiring a labor force of caregivers to be made accessible to all city residents who do not live in the Commons. The caregivers who used to freelance for aged baby boomers became city workers. Most of them were former inmates, migrants, and people living in poverty. 

Present Day

The present year is 2060, and the Reproductive Commons has been running for a decade with much success. Nearly all families in New York City have free access to childcare and caregiving. The DRL must now answer to a new aspect of the reproductive labor movement. Within the Commons and elsewhere, some women are now demanding liberation from gestation itself. More and more are turning to surrogates to bear their children, opening new class divides that the DRL will have to address. There is talk of a new type of reproductive commons strictly for breeding, intended to raise children scientifically through their most sensitive years before they live with their parents full time.

It is unclear if the state can keep up with these demands. It took decades to implement the DRL and the Commons program, and a further and final push for liberation from all child bearing may be too great a task for even the best run programs. 

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050 are part of an oral history project initiated by the Department of Reproductive Labor, which documents the experiences of caregivers and families in a period of immense change.

Grace, who is now 60, still works as a caregiver. In 2055, she was employed by the DRL to be part of their care labor force.

Tai, who is now 50, still lives in the Commons with her newborn. 

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050 are part of an oral history project initiated by the Department of Reproductive Labor, which documents the experiences of caregivers and families in a period of immense change.

Grace, who is now 60, still works as a caregiver. In 2055, she was employed by the DRL to be part of their care labor force.

Tai, who is now 50, still lives in the Commons with her newborn. 

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050 are part of an oral history project initiated by the Department of Reproductive Labor, which documents the experiences of caregivers and families in a period of immense change.

Grace, who is now 60, still works as a caregiver. In 2055, she was employed by the DRL to be part of their care labor force.

Tai, who is now 50, still lives in the Commons with her newborn. 

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050 are part of an oral history project initiated by the Department of Reproductive Labor, which documents the experiences of caregivers and families in a period of immense change.

Grace, who is now 60, still works as a caregiver. In 2055, she was employed by the DRL to be part of their care labor force.

Tai, who is now 50, still lives in the Commons with her newborn. 

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050

Grace, 2030 and Tai, 2050 are part of an oral history project initiated by the Department of Reproductive Labor, which documents the experiences of caregivers and families in a period of immense change.

Grace, who is now 60, still works as a caregiver. In 2055, she was employed by the DRL to be part of their care labor force.

Tai, who is now 50, still lives in the Commons with her newborn. 

WeProductive (2035)

WeProductive v.2 Demo is a demonstration video which shows the main task exchange functions of the app. The app was founded by Tai Robbins, Ada Lang, and Ben Keller in 2035 as a grass-roots movement to alleviate some of the physical burdens of the second shift. It began with informal transactions on Slack and Google Sheets, and grew to a fully functioning mobile app by 2040. 

WeProductive (2035)

WeProductive v.2 Demo is a demonstration video which shows the main task exchange functions of the app. The app was founded by Tai Robbins, Ada Lang, and Ben Keller in 2035 as a grass-roots movement to alleviate some of the physical burdens of the second shift. It began with informal transactions on Slack and Google Sheets, and grew to a fully functioning mobile app by 2040. 

WeProductive (2035)

WeProductive v.2 Demo is a demonstration video which shows the main task exchange functions of the app. The app was founded by Tai Robbins, Ada Lang, and Ben Keller in 2035 as a grass-roots movement to alleviate some of the physical burdens of the second shift. It began with informal transactions on Slack and Google Sheets, and grew to a fully functioning mobile app by 2040. 

WeProductive (2035)

WeProductive v.2 Demo is a demonstration video which shows the main task exchange functions of the app. The app was founded by Tai Robbins, Ada Lang, and Ben Keller in 2035 as a grass-roots movement to alleviate some of the physical burdens of the second shift. It began with informal transactions on Slack and Google Sheets, and grew to a fully functioning mobile app by 2040. 

WeProductive (2035)

WeProductive v.2 Demo is a demonstration video which shows the main task exchange functions of the app. The app was founded by Tai Robbins, Ada Lang, and Ben Keller in 2035 as a grass-roots movement to alleviate some of the physical burdens of the second shift. It began with informal transactions on Slack and Google Sheets, and grew to a fully functioning mobile app by 2040. 

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Care Robot, Log 2030-2040

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040 is a documentation of the individuals cared for by a single first generation caregiving robot released by the DRL. Each robot has a record of all of its patients throughout its history, which is then used to improve each new release.

The use of sensors and tracking devices were approved by the individuals and families involved.

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040 is a documentation of the individuals cared for by a single first generation caregiving robot released by the DRL. Each robot has a record of all of its patients throughout its history, which is then used to improve each new release.

The use of sensors and tracking devices were approved by the individuals and families involved.

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040 is a documentation of the individuals cared for by a single first generation caregiving robot released by the DRL. Each robot has a record of all of its patients throughout its history, which is then used to improve each new release.

The use of sensors and tracking devices were approved by the individuals and families involved.

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040 is a documentation of the individuals cared for by a single first generation caregiving robot released by the DRL. Each robot has a record of all of its patients throughout its history, which is then used to improve each new release.

The use of sensors and tracking devices were approved by the individuals and families involved.

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040

Care Robot, Log 2030-2040 is a documentation of the individuals cared for by a single first generation caregiving robot released by the DRL. Each robot has a record of all of its patients throughout its history, which is then used to improve each new release.

The use of sensors and tracking devices were approved by the individuals and families involved.

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Form R-4 (2052)

Form R-4 (2052) is an application form to be completed by families and their employers to determine their eligibility for housing in the Reproductive Commons for Families with Young Children. Form R-4 asked families to disclose their income level, how many children they had, whether they had a working spouse, and other information about their reproductive labor situations. These factors were taken into consideration to decide who could live in the Reproductive Commons and who could not.

Form R-4 (2052)

Form R-4 (2052) is an application form to be completed by families and their employers to determine their eligibility for housing in the Reproductive Commons for Families with Young Children. Form R-4 asked families to disclose their income level, how many children they had, whether they had a working spouse, and other information about their reproductive labor situations. These factors were taken into consideration to decide who could live in the Reproductive Commons and who could not.

Form R-4 (2052)

Form R-4 (2052) is an application form to be completed by families and their employers to determine their eligibility for housing in the Reproductive Commons for Families with Young Children. Form R-4 asked families to disclose their income level, how many children they had, whether they had a working spouse, and other information about their reproductive labor situations. These factors were taken into consideration to decide who could live in the Reproductive Commons and who could not.

Form R-4 (2052)

Form R-4 (2052) is an application form to be completed by families and their employers to determine their eligibility for housing in the Reproductive Commons for Families with Young Children. Form R-4 asked families to disclose their income level, how many children they had, whether they had a working spouse, and other information about their reproductive labor situations. These factors were taken into consideration to decide who could live in the Reproductive Commons and who could not.

Form R-4 (2052)

Form R-4 (2052) is an application form to be completed by families and their employers to determine their eligibility for housing in the Reproductive Commons for Families with Young Children. Form R-4 asked families to disclose their income level, how many children they had, whether they had a working spouse, and other information about their reproductive labor situations. These factors were taken into consideration to decide who could live in the Reproductive Commons and who could not.

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Know Your Rights! (2053)

Know Your Rights! is an educational pamphlet distributed by the DRL. It states new legal protections that family members have as parents and employees under Family Feminism Forever Act of 2053. The act was designed for families who did not qualify for the Reproductive Commons. Since 2053, families have been enjoying certain rights and benefits, such as a maternity/paternity grant from their employer, and 24/7 access to direct caregiving provided by the DRL.

Know Your Rights! (2053)

Know Your Rights! is an educational pamphlet distributed by the DRL. It states new legal protections that family members have as parents and employees under Family Feminism Forever Act of 2053. The act was designed for families who did not qualify for the Reproductive Commons. Since 2053, families have been enjoying certain rights and benefits, such as a maternity/paternity grant from their employer, and 24/7 access to direct caregiving provided by the DRL.

Know Your Rights! (2053)

Know Your Rights! is an educational pamphlet distributed by the DRL. It states new legal protections that family members have as parents and employees under Family Feminism Forever Act of 2053. The act was designed for families who did not qualify for the Reproductive Commons. Since 2053, families have been enjoying certain rights and benefits, such as a maternity/paternity grant from their employer, and 24/7 access to direct caregiving provided by the DRL.

Know Your Rights! (2053)

Know Your Rights! is an educational pamphlet distributed by the DRL. It states new legal protections that family members have as parents and employees under Family Feminism Forever Act of 2053. The act was designed for families who did not qualify for the Reproductive Commons. Since 2053, families have been enjoying certain rights and benefits, such as a maternity/paternity grant from their employer, and 24/7 access to direct caregiving provided by the DRL.

Know Your Rights! (2053)

Know Your Rights! is an educational pamphlet distributed by the DRL. It states new legal protections that family members have as parents and employees under Family Feminism Forever Act of 2053. The act was designed for families who did not qualify for the Reproductive Commons. Since 2053, families have been enjoying certain rights and benefits, such as a maternity/paternity grant from their employer, and 24/7 access to direct caregiving provided by the DRL.